CBER in the News

27 January 2020 - Tom Latek (Kentucky Today)

FRANKFORT — There was a dip in Kentucky’s unemployment rate in December compared to the previous month, according to the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet.

The preliminary December 2019 jobless rate was 4.3%, down 0.1 percentage points from the 4.4% recorded for the state in November 2019, as well as for December 2018. This compares to the U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for December 2019 of 3.5%, unchanged from November 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

23 January 2020 - The Lane Report

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary December 2019 unemployment rate was 4.3%, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC).

The preliminary December 2019 jobless rate was down 0.1% from the 4.4% recorded for the state in November 2019. The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for December 2019 was 3.5%, unchanged from November 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

23 January 2020 - Chris Otts (WDRB)

The share of Kentucky workers belonging to unions has reached a record low three years after the Republican-controlled state legislature passed a right-to-work law.

Federal data released Wednesday show 8% of Kentucky workers belonged to unions in 2019, the lowest since U.S. Department of Labor began keeping state-by-state figures in 2000.

9 January 2020 (Stu Johnson - WEKU)

The interim director of the University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics said monthly unemployment figures don’t offer a complete picture of the overall economy. 

6 January 2020 (Becca Schimmel - WKYU)

The year: 2009. A Senator from Illinois named Barack Obama has just made history upon taking the presidential oath of office. The national economy is at a low point in the Great Recession. And the Pittsburgh Steelers are the first NFL team to win six Super Bowls.

Ten years later, as 2019 gives way to a new decade, the country is a radically different place, and the Ohio Valley is no exception.

22 November 2019 - News-Democrat & Leader 

Kentucky's seasonally adjusted preliminary October 2019 unemployment rate was 4.3 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC). The unemployment rate for October 2019 was down from the 4.4 percent reported for September 2019.

The preliminary October 2019 jobless rate was unchanged compared to the 4.3 percent recorded for the state in October 2018.

18 November 2019 (The Lane Report)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary October 2019 unemployment rate was 4.3 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC). The unemployment rate for October 2019 was down from the 4.4 percent reported for September 2019.

The preliminary October 2019 jobless rate was unchanged compared to the 4.3 percent recorded for the state in October 2018.

16 November 2019 (Tom Latek - Kentucky Today)

FRANKFORT -- Kentucky's seasonally adjusted preliminary October unemployment rate was 4.3 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics, down 0.1 percent from September and the same as October 2018.

The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for October was 3.6 percent, up 0.1 percentage points from the previous month, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

14 November 2019

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 14, 2019) – Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary October 2019 unemployment rate was 4.3 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC). The unemployment rate for October 2019 was down from the 4.4 percent reported for September 2019.

The preliminary October 2019 jobless rate was unchanged compared to the 4.3 percent recorded for the state in October 2018.

14 November 2019 - Steve Matthews (Bloomberg)

After Europe retaliated with tariffs on Kentucky bourbon in response to President Donald Trump’s trade war, the James E. Pepper distillery in Lexington so far this year has suffered a more than 20% sales decline internationally.

“We’re collateral damage,” said Amir Peay, the 42-year-old owner. While tensions may be easing, “what we need is stability. I can’t make long-term decisions about capital allocation, about hiring people, about where to grow my business if I don’t have certainty and stability. We have none of that.”