CBER in the News

2 August 2020 - Keith Lawrence (Messenger-Inquirer)

State records show that unemployment rates dropped dramatically in June.

But things aren’t as good as the numbers indicate.

Mike Clark, director of the University of Kentucky’s Center for Business and Economic Research, says things haven’t returned to normal.

20 July 2020 - Lisa Autry (WKYU)

Mike Clark, head of the University of Kentucky’s Center for Business and Economic Research, said while the jobless rate has returned to pre-pandemic levels, it doesn’t indicate the state’s economy has returned to normal.

Kentucky’s official unemployment rate is trending downward since swelling to more than 15 percent at the height of the coronavirus outbreak. 

June’s jobless rate was 4.3 percent, mirroring the rate recorded for the state one year ago.

16 July 2020 - River City News

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary June 2020 unemployment rate was 4.3 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC).

The preliminary June 2020 jobless rate was down 6.6 percentage points from May 2020 and equaled the 4.3 percent recorded for the state one year ago. The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for June 2020 was 11.1 percent, down from 13.3 percent in May 2020, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. 

14 July 2020 - John Charlton (WHAS)

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Governor Andy Beshear is keeping a close eye on other states which have been forced to roll back business reopenings due to alarming spikes in COVID-19 cases.

Many of those states reopened faster than Kentucky did.

At Monday’s press briefing, Gov. Beshear pointed out that certain areas in the commonwealth have been experiencing troubling rises in positive tests since reopening.

19 June 2020 - Paul Hitchcock (WYMK)

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary May 2020 unemployment rate was 11 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC).

The preliminary May 2020 jobless rate was down 5.6 percentage points from April 2020 and up 6.7 percentage points from the 4.3 percent recorded for the state in May 2019. The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for May 2020 was 13.3 percent, down from 14.7 percent in April 2020, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

19 June 2020 - Norther Kentucky Tribune

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary May 2020 unemployment rate was 11 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency within the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet (EWDC).

18 June 2020 - Stephen Loiaconi (KATU)

WASHINGTON (Sinclair Broadcast Group) — New jobless claims slowed this week amid signs that the economy may be recovering from the coronavirus pandemic faster than expected, but some economists say more stimulus from Congress is still needed to avoid losing ground, especially if the outbreak resurges in the months ahead.

18 June 2020 - Steve Rogers (WTVQ)

The state’s unemployment rate fell in May but still showed the significant impact of the coronavirus economic shutdown.

According to the Kentucky Center for Statistics, Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary May 2020 unemployment rate was 11 percent, down 5.6 percentage points from April 2020 and up 6.7 percentage points from the 4.3 percent recorded for the state in May 2019.

The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for May 2020 was 13.3 percent, down from 14.7 percent in April 2020, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

18 June 2020 - West Kentucky Star

The Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet  says the state's seasonally adjusted preliminary May 2020 unemployment rate was 11 percent. 

The Cabinet says the preliminary May 2020 jobless rate was down 5.6 percentage points from April 2020, and was up 6.7 percentage points from the 4.3 percent recorded for the state in May 2019. The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for May 2020 was 13.3 percent, down from 14.7 percent in April 2020, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

While states’ social distancing orders appear to have slowed the spread of COVID-19, they have also had a costly economic impact. Early data suggest that the nation could experience its largest employment losses since the great depression. These losses appear to be widespread, even hitting sectors typically unaffected by economic downturns. As states begin to reopen, concerns about the progression of the virus create an uncertain landscape for state and local governments, businesses, and families. Join Michael Clark PhD as he discusses the economic impact of COVID-19.